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Man claims his sex doll is 'so much better' than his wife

Man claims his sex doll is 'so much better' than his wife

For some, the idea of entering into a romantic relationship with a plastic doll might seem bizarre and objectionable. For others, however, such an affair is precisely what they need to alleviate their difficulties connecting passionately to human lovers.

Remember the 2007 film Lars and the Real Girl, starring Ryan Gosling? Lars suffers from anxiety and insecurities, and thus prefers the company of his artificial mistress over the pressures of dealing with a real person.

It seems the fictional Lars certainly isn’t alone in his fears. In fact, Japan is experiencing a surge of men that are using dalliances with dolls to overcome their insecurities.

Masayuki Ozaki started a relationship with his silicone companion, Mayu, after his marriage had lost its fizz. Ozaki insists that Mayu has become the love of his life. She shares Masayuki’s bed and lives in Tokyo under the same roof as his wife and daughter.

The unusual situation initially led to some heated arguments between Ozaki and his wife, but the estranged couple later reached an agreement.

Ozaki says he began to feel a “deep sense of loneliness” after his wife became disinterested in sex following the birth of their daughter. But he claims that “the moment I saw Mayu in the showroom, it was love at first sight.”

Ozaki, a physiotherapist by profession, regularly places Mayu in a wheelchair and takes her out on dates. He says he enjoys dressing her in wigs of different styles, jewelry, and sexy clothing.

The idea of romantic relationships with humans has become off-putting to Ozaki, who alleges that “Japanese women are cold-hearted.”

In Ozaki’s opinion, women in Japan are selfish and don’t fulfill a man’s desire to have a companion to talk to.

According to the New York Post, Ozaki is merely one of an increasing surge of Japanese men who are turning to synthetic sex dolls for the sort of romantic relationships that they long for.

Japanese scientists are concerned about the country’s significant drop in birth rates and believe that the sex doll craze will continue to impact the potentially devastating population decline negatively.

Manufacturers like Orient Industries create roughly 2,000 hyper-realistic sex dolls per year. The average cost of such a doll is $6,000, and each model comes with posable fingers, a removable head, and life-like genitals.

Orient Industry’s Managing Director, Hideo Tsuchiya, says that “technology has come a long way since those nasty inflatable dolls in the 1970s.”

Tsuchiya claims that the outer silicone texture of the dolls feels like real human skin, and “more men are buying them because they feel they can actually communicate with the dolls.”

Sixty-one-year-old Senji Nakajima has named his doll Saori. Like Masayuki Ozaki, Nakajima was also driven by loneliness when he decided to purchase a sex doll. After living with Saori for a few months, Nakajima says she developed her own unique personality.

Reconciliation with his wife is unlikely, says Nakajima. Such a development would mean he “wouldn’t be able to take a bath with Saori, or snuggle up with her and watch TV.”

Yoshitaka Hyodo, a 43-year-old blogger who resides in Saitama, owns at least 10 sex dolls. He dresses them in military uniforms to fulfill a personal sexual fantasy.

Hyodo believes that more men will choose relationships with sex dolls in the future because “it’s less stress and they complain a lot less than women.” For him, it’s not so much about sex as it is “about connecting on an emotional level.”

Orient Industries creates these top-of-the-range Japanese sex dolls, offering premium silicone human likenesses to an exclusive luxury market. However, the company has recently branched out and is now shipping dolls to destinations worldwide.

The company claims that future doll buyers can expect “next-generation sexbots” that will be able to talk, laugh, remember your birthday, and even simulate an orgasm.

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95 percent of the victims of violence are men. Because women are natural cowards who send men to handle things when they are dangerous.

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Here’s What Actually Happens When You Wake Up During Surgery Let’s talk about the bizarre thing that can happen on the operating table.

BuzzFeedNews

1. It's a clinical phenomenon called anesthetic awareness.

'Anesthetic awareness, also known as intraoperative recall, occurs when a patient becomes conscious during a procedure that is performed under general anesthesia, and they can recall this episode of waking up after the surgery is over,' Dr. Daniel Cole, president-elect of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, tells BuzzFeed Life. Patients may remember the incident immediately after the surgery, or sometimes even days or weeks later. But rest assured, doctors are doing everything they can and using the best technology available to make sure this doesn't happen.

2. One to two people out of 1,000 wake up during surgery each year in the United States.

"It's not a huge number, but it's enough people that it's definitely a problem," says Cole. Plus, the true rate could be even higher. "The data is all over the place because it's mostly self-reported." "Ideally, the anesthesiologist would routinely see the patient post-operation and ask them about intraoperative awareness," he says. But this opportunity is often lost because patients are discharged or choose to go home as soon as they can after surgery. "Even if they remember three, five days later, they might feel embarrassed and don't want to make a big deal so they don't mention it to their surgeon. So there can be underreporting of awareness."

3. It happens when general anesthesia fails.

General anesthesia is supposed to do two things: keep the patient totally unconscious or 'asleep' during surgery, and with no memory of the entire procedure. If there is a decreased amount of anesthesia for some reason, the patient can start to wake up. The cocktail of medication in general anesthesia often includes an analgesic to relieve pain and a paralytic. The paralytic does exactly what it sounds like — it paralyzes the body so that it remains still. When the anesthesia does fail, the paralytics make it especially difficult for patients to indicate that they're awake.

4. And it's not the same as conscious sedation.

Conscious sedation, sometimes referred to as "twilight sleep" is when you're given a combination of a sedative and a local or regional anesthetic (which just numbs one part or section of the body) for minor surgeries, and it's not intended to knock you out completely or cause deep unconciousness. It's typically what you would get while getting your wisdom teeth out, having a minor foot surgery, or getting a colonoscopy. With conscious sedation, you may fall asleep or drift in and out of sleep, but this isn't the same as true anesthetic awareness, says Cole.

5. Contrary to popular belief, it doesn't usually happen right in the middle of surgery.

"The anesthesiologist is very aware that this can happen and never relaxes or lets down their guard at any point during the surgery, no matter how long," says Cole. "Awareness tends to occur on the margins, when the procedure is starting and you don't have the full anesthetic dose or when you're waking up from anesthesia, because it's safest to decrease the amount of anesthesia very slowly and gradually toward the end." However, this also depends on the surgery and patient... which we'll get to in a little bit.

6. Patients often report hearing sounds and voices. "The most common sensation is auditory," says Cole. Patients will report that they were aware of voices, and even conversations that went on in the operating room — which can be especially terrifying if loud tools are involved. "If you look at the effects of anesthetics on the brain, the auditory system is the last one to shut down, so it makes a lot of sense."

And opening your eyes to see the surgeons operating on you? Basically impossible. "First of all, the anesthesia puts you to sleep, so your eyelids shut naturally. Even if you regain consciousness, the anesthesia still restricts muscle movement so your eyes will stay shut," Cole explains. "But there's still 10–20% eye opening when you sleep. So during surgery, we will cover the patient's eyes or tape them shut to prevent injury and keep the eyes clean."

7. Few patients experience pressure (and rarely pain) during anesthetic awareness.

Less than a third of patients who report anesthetic awareness also report experiencing pressure or pain, says Cole. "But that's still one too many, because the patient is kind of locked in and aware of what's happening to them but unable to move, which is terrifying." Typically, sufficient analgesic (pain reliever) is given, so that even if you wake up you won't feel pain. "More often, we use an anesthetic technique which includes a morphine-type drug to reduce pain. But this is really required for when the patient wakes up and they no longer have anesthetic so they are conscious and aware of pain," Cole says.

Even if the analgesic wears off, there should be sufficient anesthesia to keep the patient unconscious and pain-free. "It's rare. You'd have to both have insufficient anesthesia and insufficient pain medicine at the same time to feel prolonged pain during awareness," Cole says.

8. Anesthetic awareness can cause anxiety and PTSD.

"The potential psychological effects of awareness range greatly," says Cole. "It can cause anxiety, flashbacks, fear, loneliness, panic attacks — PTSD is the worse. It's been reported in a small minority of patients, but it can be very severe." says Cole. If doctors hear about someone having intraoperative awareness, they will try to get the person into therapy as early as possible, before memories can be embedded in a harmful or stressful way to patients. "If you were in the hospital for a week and on day two we heard that you woke up during surgery, we'd get a therapist in the same day. We always want to mitigate so we can try to reduce the severity of symptoms," Cole says.

9. It's most often caused by an equipment malfunction.

General anesthesia can either be given intravenously (where all or most is given through an IV) or more commonly as a gas, which you breathe in through a mask. If the equipment in either of these were to malfunction, and the anesthesiologist wasn't aware of it because the signal that gas is too low doesn't work, for example, then patients would stop receiving medication and start to wake up. Again, this is terrifying but rare.

"The anesthesia equipment is like an airplane," Cole says. "The anesthesiologist will do a pre-flight check and go over all equipment to make sure it works. But sometimes, that equipment can malfunction as short as an hour later so it won't show up before taking off." Likewise, there is equipment used to monitor the patient's vitals and brain activity, which can also fail to signal to doctors that the patient is waking up.

10. Less commonly, it's the physician or anesthesiologist's fault.

"Any time humans are involved, human error is always a possibility — but it’s more common that technology fails," says Cole. "Physicians and anesthesiologists are well-trained to look out for signs of awareness during surgery, which obviously includes any movement of muscles and changes in vitals." Since paralytics are often involved, doctors also closely monitor other signs like heart rate, blood pressure, tears, or brain electrical activity for any red flags. However, sometimes patients can be on medications that suppress the body's responses and inhibit the monitoring systems from effectively picking up warning signs of light anesthesia and awareness. These incidences can make it difficult to detect awareness, so physician anesthesiologists must closely watch an array of signs.

11. It is more likely to happen during surgeries that require "light" anesthesia.

Anesthesia also comes with risk factors, and can be harmful depending on the surgery or patient's risk. "Awareness can occur when there is too light of anesthesia, which we often do deliberately for high-risk situations," says Cole. According to the American Society of Anesthesiologists, high-risk surgeries include heart surgery, brain surgery, and emergency surgeries in which the patient has lost a lot of blood or they can easily go into shock. Or the patient may need a lower dose of anesthesia due to risk factors such as heart problems, obesity, a genetic factor, or being on narcotics or sedatives. "For instance, anesthesia depresses the heart, so a normal dose could be life-threatening to someone with heart problems," Cole explains.

"Sometimes you have to make a trade off," says Cole. "Would you rather have a high level of anesthesia which threatens your body's life functions, or a low level which ensures safety but increases the risks of waking up during the procedure?"

12. ...But if that's the case, your doctor will talk to you about it first.

Patients often feel better knowing that the decreased amount of anesthesia is for their own safety. "We tell the patient that there's an increased chance that you may hear some voices or fuzziness, but if it gets uncomfortable we can tell and will increase the dose," says Cole. "Patients are more understanding and happy when they understand that the risk of waking up is for their own safety."

Also, you should know that if you've had a previous incidence of awareness, that puts you at higher risk for another episode. Cole explains that in this case, doctors will spend a lot of time with the patient and anesthesiologist describing exactly what to expect, so that hopefully they won’t experience it again.

13. ALL THAT BEING SAID, the chances of this happening are slim, and medical professionals are doing everything they can to ensure that this does not happen.

According to Cole, it's always helpful to spend some time pre-operatively with the surgeon and physician anesthesiologist going over the procedure and how they'll get you through it safely and comfortably.

"I do something called 'patient engagement' and 'shared decision-making' so I can make sure the patient understands literally everything. Some patients don't want to talk about awareness because it will give them more anxiety, and they just trust us," says Cole. However, even if you aren't at risk, your doctors will be happy to answer any questions you have about anesthesia before the procedure.

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Surgery Offers Hope for Victims of Female Genital Mutilation

About 500,000 women in the United States have undergone genital mutilation. Surgery can restore some of their genital functions.

Can women who have lost the ability to experience sexual pleasure due to female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) ever regain it?

For some women, surgical treatments offer hope.

Dr. Marci Bowers is one of a few gynecologic surgeons who performs clitoral reconstruction surgery on women who have undergone FGM/C.

She primarily treats women who have undergone type 2 FGM/C, in which part or all of the external clitoris, labia minora, and sometimes labia majora are removed.

For many women who have undergone type 2 FGM/C, sex can be unpleasant or even painful.

“It can really diminish the desire for sexual contact,” Bowers told Healthline. “And after all, that’s kind of what it’s meant to do. It’s meant to control women’s sexuality.”

Clitoral reconstruction surgery can potentially help improve sexual function by repositioning the internal portion of the clitoris that remains intact.

“The surgery is really simple in its design,” Bowers explained. “It’s meant to uncover the clitoris, bring it forward, and then suture it into place so that it can be accessible during sexual contact.”

“The operation takes less than an hour,” she added. “The two keys to it are removing the scar tissue and releasing the suspensory ligament, which is the key component in allowing the clitoris to come down.”

While all surgeries pose some risks, Bowers reports high success rates.

“It works virtually every single time,” she said. “The woman’s [sexual] feelings are overwhelming improved when this is done.”

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 200 million girls and women who are alive today have undergone FGM/C.

About 500,000 of them live in the United States.

FGM/C includes any procedure that intentionally alters or injures female genital organs for nonmedical purposes.

It is performed as a cultural practice in many communities around the world, particularly in parts of Africa, the Middle East, and Asia.

In the United States, performing FGM/C on a minor or transporting them to another country to undergo the procedure is a federal crime.

Last month, the first federal case involving FGM/C was filed in Michigan.

Dr. Jumana Nagarwala, an emergency room physician, stands accused of performing the procedure on two 7-year-old girls.

Charges have also been filed against Dr. Fakhruddin Attar and Farida Attar, who are accused of assisting Nagarwala. Attar owns a medical clinic in Michigan where the procedures were reportedly performed.

While all three defendants are members of the Dawoodi Bohra, a Muslim sect based in India, FGM/C is a cultural practice that crosses religious lines.

“If it was a Muslim or religious practice in general, then all Muslim women would have to undergo it, and that’s not the case,” Haddijatou Ceesay, a program coordinator for Safe Hands for Girls, a nonprofit organization led by survivors of FGM/C, told Healthline.

FGM/C is practiced by members of some Muslim, Christian, and Jewish communities.

FGM/C is widely considered a human rights violation.

It has no known health benefits and many risks.

In the short term, it can cause bleeding, infection, and even death.

In the long term, it can lead to many chronic health problems.

“Girls and women can end up with painful periods, difficulty urinating, a really difficult time having sex,” Ceesay said. “A lot of them end up having a lack of sexual sensation. It can cause infertility, difficulty giving birth, and obstetric fistulas. It can also lead to PTSD, depression, and anxiety for some.”

Given the wide-ranging effects that FGM/C can have, Ceesay suggested that multiple types of care and support are often needed.

Dr. Jasmine Abdulcadir, a gynecologist in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG), Switzerland, agreed.

Abdulcadir operates an outpatient clinic for women who have undergone FGM/C. She also conducts research and acts as a WHO consultant.

“If you want to promote sexual health, you need to focus not just on a woman’s genitals, but on her whole person. On her mind and body,” she told Healthline.

Although Abdulcadir has conducted clitoral reconstruction surgeries on some patients, she warned that more research is needed on the safety and efficacy of the procedure.

She added that surgery is not always the best approach.

“We do a lot of health education and counseling because many of the women who request clitoral reconstruction still have a functional clitoris but don’t realize it,” she said. “Many of them don’t know much about their own anatomy, and after being exposed to messages about the negative effects of FGM, they assume they can’t experience sexual pleasure.”

She suggested that the needs of many patients are better met through education and counseling, rather than surgery. For those who do undergo surgery, additional follow-up care may be needed.

“A multidisciplinary approach is really important, not only for deciding whether surgery is needed, but also for providing follow-up care,” she said. “The genital pain caused by reconstructive surgery can recall the pain of genital cutting and traumatic memories from a woman’s past.”

To help prevent future cases of FGM/C, Abdulcadir and organizations like Safe Hands for Girls emphasize the importance of community education.

“Turning survivors into advocates of ending FGM is a huge thing that we’re working on,” Ceesay said. “For a lot of them, it gives them a sense of inspiration and empowerment, knowing that they’re able to help stop the next generation from going through what they went through.”

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